SmArts Project - YARTS (Youth Arts) Project

 

In 2001 and 2002 with funds provided by the State Government, via grants from the The Adult Community Education Unit and Country Arts SA, Arts Excentrix mounted an extensive youth arts and learning project called YARTS. In 2002 additional funds were provided to extend the YARTS Project and to expand it to include learners of all ages. This second project was called the SmARTS project.

These projects focused on Regional South Australia providing workshops in the Murray Mallee, Adelaide Hills, the Fleurieu Peninsula (including Kangaroo Island) and the Barossa.

 

The key aim of these projects was to engage learners through participation in Arts practice.  Workshops were provided in Fabric Painting and Printing, Batik, Tie- Dyeing, Felt-work, Graphic Art, Portraiture, Face Painting, Willow-work, Costume and Prop Design and Construction., Ceramics, Paver-making, Sculpture, Storytelling, Creative Writing, Music Technology, African Drumming, Dance,  Performance and Event presentation and Management. The key aim of these projects was to engage learners through participation in Arts practice.  Workshops were provided in Fabric Painting and Printing, Batik, Tie- Dyeing, Felt-work, Graphic Art, Portraiture, Face Painting, Willow-work, Costume and Prop Design and Construction., Ceramics, Paver-making, Sculpture, Storytelling, Creative Writing, Music Technology, African Drumming, Dance,  Performance and Event presentation and Management.

 

These projects were highly successful and led to ongoing learning, exhibiting and performing throughout the region long after the projects had concluded.

 

One of the outcomes of these projects was the Creation of two music performing groups, Baroomba in Goolwa and Djembassa in McLaren Vale.

Introduction to the Gathering. - Andrew McNicol
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The Gathering was a celebratory event bringing together workshop participants and tutors in a performance at the Singing Gallery in McLaren Vale. This audio is an introduction to that event by the then Co Artistic Director Andrew McNicol